Schools of Social Work School Social Workers Family Social Workers Child Welfare Social Workers Clinical Social Workers

Social Workers

The influence and presence of the social work profession is vast and diverse. Social workers address the needs of children and families in every walk of life, and in every arena of functioning. Family agencies, schools, health care systems, addiction treatment centers and employee assistance programs are but a few of the settings where social workers bring their skills and humanity to tackle the pressing issues in the lives of individuals, groups, and communities. Thus, the majority of social workers are in a unique practice position, rife with opportunities, to identify and assist children of alcoholics and drug dependent persons.

Indeed COAs are often a hidden population, isolated and unidentified right before our eyes. Social Workers bring a wealth of talent and commitment to the process of offering hope to the families affected by alcoholism or substance use disorders.

Schools of Social Work

The Schools of Social Work are the lifeblood of the profession. The future of Social Work resides in the researchers, the teachers, the innovators. It is their calling to support and inspire social workers to best practices and to the best outcomes for the populations they serve. With the vision of the schools of social work, the call has been answered to infuse the wisdom and energy of social workers to address the needs of children in families with substance use or mental health disorders. This has opened a door to incalculable benefits to many who could have continued to suffer in silence in the face of the formidable challenges of family substance use or mental health disorders. In addition to the following resources on-site training is also available through NACoA.

CORE COMPETENCIES FOR SOCIAL WORKERS IN ADDRESSING THE NEEDS OF CHILDREN OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG DEPENDENT PARENTS

SOCIAL WORK WITH CHILDREN OF ALCOHOL- AND DRUG-DEPENDENT PARENTS

Catherine L. Herzog, PhD, MSW, and Linda Kaplan, MA.
This is an invitation to Social Workers to explore or enhance existing efforts, in addressing the needs of families affected by alcohol and other dependence. Indeed “COAs” are often a hidden population, isolated and unidentified, right before our eyes. Social Workers bring a wealth of talent and commitment to the process of offering hope to the families affected by alcohol and other drug abuse.

PARENTAL SUBSTANCE USE AND THE CHILD WELFARE SYSTEM CHILDREN’S BUREAU

A SOCIAL WORKER’S ROLE IN DRUG COURT

SAGE OPEN, Melinda R. Roberts, Iris Phillips, Thomas D. Bordelon, and Lisa Seif

Social Work Training Modules

Social Work Training Modules

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism has presented these training modules for formal Social Work Education. The training modules provide a level of information and skill identified as appropriate for social workers.

Given the family systems orientation, these modules give insight into the role of the family in alcoholism. There is a wealth of information in these modules including nine modules on alcoholism as an entity, and 12 modules on “Special Populations.” Training in “Alcohol and Families”l is contained in Module 10J.

Learning Objectives:

  • Recognize a family systems perspective of alcohol use disorders.

  • Be familiar with family factors that increase or reduce risk of developing an alcohol use disorder.

  • Be familiar with family problems that may result from or co-occur with an alcohol use disorder.

  • Understand recent research concerning the relationship between family factors and recovery.

Each module comes with a text handout, a presentation slide and a PowerPoint presentation. Although these modules were not written for the layperson, there is a monumental amount of information available in these training modules that are likely to be of use to other members of the primary care community.

Click here to access the curriculum materials

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism has presented these training modules for formal Social Work Education. The training modules provide a level of information and skill identified as appropriate for social workers.

Given the family systems orientation, these modules give insight into the role of the family in alcoholism. There is a wealth of information in these modules including nine modules on alcoholism as an entity, and 12 modules on “Special Populations.” Training in “Alcohol and Families”l is contained in Module 10J.

Read More »

Curriculum module

This is a 3 – hour learning module developed by Shelly A. Wiechelt, Ph.D. University of Maryland, Baltimore County, School of Social Work.

  • Originally developed for the National Association for Children of Alcoholics as part of the Social Work Initiative, this curriculum module could be adapted used in many settings where introductory information is needed.

  • The module is designed to introduce foundation level social work students to the experiences and challenges that children of substance abusing parents face.

  • It is intended to introduce students to assessment strategies that will enable them to recognize substance use problems in families.

  • It addresses helping strategies that will enable students to provide appropriate interventions and referrals.

  • The module includes information on definitions, prevalence, theoretical frameworks, and helping strategies.

  • The module can be adapted to emphasize theory or practice depending on the course.

  • The module provides students with knowledge and skills that will enable them to begin to acquire the core competencies that generalist social workers need for practice with children and families affected by parental substance use disorders.

This is a 3 – hour learning module developed by Shelly A. Wiechelt, Ph.D. University of Maryland, Baltimore County, School of Social Work.

  • Originally developed for the National Association for Children of Alcoholics as part of the Social Work Initiative, this curriculum module could be adapted used in many settings where introductory information is needed.

Read More »

Curriculum Module PowerPoint

This is an excellent introduction to substance use and substance disorders written by Shelly A. Wiechelt, Ph.D. University of Maryland, Baltimore County, School of Social Work. It was produced by Dr. Wiechelt for the NACoA Social Work Initiative and has immeasurable value for Social Workers themselves, as well as the populations they serve.

  • The Curriculum Module PowerPoint contains definitions and clarification for many concepts in the alcohol and other drug fields that are often confused or misunderstood entirely.

  • This curriculum module identifies the many theoretical models used to understand substance use disorders along with models of prevention and interventions for the substance use disorders.

  • The bulk of the information included in the Curriculum Module PowerPoint, however, is devoted to the effects of parental substance use disorder on children.

  • Risk and protective factors, and resilience are explored along with strategies to enhance resilience in children living in very difficult situations.

This is an excellent introduction to substance use and substance disorders written by Shelly A. Wiechelt, Ph.D. University of Maryland, Baltimore County, School of Social Work. It was produced by Dr. Wiechelt for the NACoA Social Work Initiative and has immeasurable value for Social Workers themselves, as well as the populations they serve.

  • The Curriculum Module PowerPoint contains definitions and clarification for many concepts in the alcohol and other drug fields that are often confused or misunderstood entirely.

Read More »

School Social Workers

The school social worker supports the administrators, the teaching faculty and anyone who is in a position where close relationships with children are developed. School Social Workers understand the school as a system and individual children as members of family systems.The following resources were selected to enhance your knowledge and effectiveness in identifying and providing service to the children who struggle with the effects of substance use or mental health disorders in their families. In addition to these resources, on-site training is available through NACoA.

Family Social Workers

The relationships you develop with the families you encounter are the mainstay of change. As they grow to trust you, they may or may not reveal the heartache they endure when substance use or mental health disorders are at work in the family. The following resources are offered here to enhance your ability to help families struggling with substance use or mental health disorders. It is hoped that the resources offered here will help you improve the lives of more and more of the families you serve. In addition to the resources listed below, on-site training is also available through NACoA.

CHILD WELFARE SOCIAL WORKERS

Each day of your professional life, you are faced with the ravages of substance use and mental health disorders. These disorders have a profound effect on all members of the families you see, but often the children suffer in silence. The following resources are provided in an effort to put tools in your hands for yourself, the children, the parents, the teachers and the many others who come to you for help. The first focus is awareness of the pervasive nature of these disorders, followed by teaching skills to the children and families who struggle with parental substance use and mental health disorders.

Clinical Social Workers

More than 20% of the families in the general population are affected by a host of difficulties inherent in the relationships where substance use or mental health disorders play a prominent role. As a Clinical Social Worker serving a referred population, you know that the percentage is even higher. The following offerings were chosen to raise or enhance your awareness of the powerful effect these disorders have on children and families struggling to manage their lives in the face of such a formidable challenge. In addition to the resources listed below, on-site training is also available through NACoA.

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