Teachers Administrators School Psychologists & Social Workers School Nurses School Counselors Support Staff PTA

Educators

Every member of the learning community is a teacher. They teach by example and they are in a unique position to teach children about healthy relationships by providing the help specific to their role. They are often entrusted with a child’s worries and concerns about their lives outside the school setting. Every member of the School Community, at some time, will be called upon to help a child who is experiencing difficulties. Many of these children come to school every day from homes impacted by alcohol or other drug problems. It is the educators who are there every day for children and they are often the ones who come to the aid of children in their care. The following groups of educators have unique opportunities to form relationships with children who need someone to listen and someone to trust.

Teachers

Children trust their teachers to educate and inspire, and they often trust teachers with their fears and worries about problems at home. Many children, however, exert great effort to hide the fact that they are struggling with substance use or mental disorders at home. For some, a teacher will be the one who notices that a child’s academic performance has changed and perhaps seems preoccupied. The resources on this page were selected to put tools and information into your hands so that:

  1. you are better prepared to notice when a child may need help and
  2. you will know what to do when a child comes to you for help.
The child’s ability to learn and develop may depend upon your knowledge and understanding.

Kit for Educators

Is there something going on at home? How can I help? The answers to these questions and many other questions can be found in the “Kit for Educators.”

  • The “Kit” can also help educators discover how alcohol or other drug addiction affect the family and how to offer the all-important support the child needs on a daily basis.

  • The “Kit for Educators” could be used as a teaching tool with anyone in the education community concerned about a specific child.

  • It is also recommended that The “Kit for Educators” be used at a staff meeting or in-service training to raise awareness of this problem that exists in 18% of the families in your community.

Is there something going on at home? How can I help? The answers to these questions and many other questions can be found in the “Kit for Educators.”

  • The “Kit” can also help educators discover how alcohol or other drug addiction affect the family and how to offer the all-important support the child needs on a daily basis.

Read More »

INFLUENTIAL FACTORS OF PARENTAL SUBSTANCE AND ALCOHOL ABUSE ON CHILDREN’S ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

Portland State University, Andrea Winters
There is much research to support the idea that parental involvement benefits a child’s educational performance. There is also strong evidence demonstrating that parental substance or alcohol abuse increases a child’s risk for behavioral problems that include drug and alcohol abuse, social-skill deficits, and low educational attainment. This study investigates the relationship between parental substance or alcohol abuse and children’s academic achievement.

SUPPORTING STUDENTS WITH INCARCERATED PARENTS

Principal Leadership, Eric Rossen
Students with incarcerated parents need support to stay connected to school and be successful academically and socially.

Administrators

The responsibilities of a school administrator are limitless. In addition to the academic and instructional challenges, the maintenance of the behavioral and emotional wellness of the students also falls to you. Children and families with substance use or mental health disorders will often come to your door. The resources included here were chosen with the intention of giving you practical information to help you support your staff as they assist children from families with alcohol or other drug problems and help you offer guidance to parents who may come to you for help. It is hoped that these tools and information will be useful and effective as you interact with students from families with alcohol and other drug abuse problems.

School Psychologists & Social Workers

As a school psychologist or school social worker, you welcome hundreds of children to school, their second home. You are the one with special training to notice the children who bring with them the immense challenges caused by substance use and mental health disorders. The resources on this page were selected to put tools and information into your hands so that: 1) you are better prepared to notice when a child may need help and 2) you will know what to do when a child comes to you for help. The child’s ability to learn and develop may depend upon your knowledge and understanding. In addition to these resources, on-site training is available through NACoA.

School Nurses

Your dedication to the health and wellness of school children brings essential service to the education community. Your clinical training brings a measure of observation and medical resources unique to your profession. You may be the one who notices that a child is in distress because of problems at home due to substance use or mental health disorder. The resources on this page were selected to put tools and information into your hands so that: 1) you are better prepared to notice when a child may need help and 2) you will know what to do when a child comes to you for help. The child’s ability to learn and develop may depend upon your knowledge and understanding. In addition to these resources, on-site training is available through NACoA.

School Counselors

The School Counselor has become the “all – purpose, go – to” helper in schools. In this role you come in contact with many students who come from difficult home situations, including those with substance use and mental health disorders.

The resources on this page were selected to put tools and information into your hands so that:

  • You are better prepared to notice when a child may need help and

  • You will know what to do when a child comes to you for help.


The child’s ability to learn and develop may depend upon your knowledge and understanding of parent alcohol and other drug abuse. In addition to these resources, on-site training is available through NACoA.

Support Staff

Every member of the learning community is a teacher. They teach by example and they are in a unique position to teach children about healthy relationships. As a support staff member you are often the trusted adult for children who have problems at home. Sometimes these children are living with an alcohol or drug addicted parent or guardian. The resources on this page were selected to put tools and information into your hands so that: 1) you are better prepared to notice when a child may need help and 2) you will know what to do when a child comes to you for help. The child’s ability to learn and develop may depend upon your knowledge and understanding. In addition to these resources, on-site training is available through NACoA.

PTA

PTA and other parent organizations intend to advocate for children and provide valuable resources to the learning community. However, the needs of children living in homes with alcohol and other drug problems may remain hidden, even to the caring parent leaders in the school community. The following resources have been selected for the parent leadership in the schools in order to: 1) raise awareness about the many children in their schools who await assistance from a caring adult and 2) inspire them to work with the school to offer programs and services that can make a difference to a significant number of children in their school. In addition to these resources, on-site training is available through NACoA.

Click here for more resources that benefit all professionals. Click here for resources to offer to children and families.